Category Archives: government policy

Exceptional Access Program 4-month backlog

There was a bit of confusion at the pharmacy when I went in for Remicade yesterday. I was billed a dispensing fee for the very first time; usually the EAC covers the entire fee and Janssen covers my deductible, so … Continue reading

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Disability Tax Credit — falling through the cracks again

Canada’s Disability Tax Credit is supposed to help lower the tax burden on “persons with disabilities or their supporting persons.” Registered disability savings plans (RDSPs) are also available to people who qualify for the tax credit to help fund the long-term care … Continue reading

Posted in bureaucracy, disability, fatigue, finances, government policy, immune suppression, symptoms, taxes, unpredictability, virus, work | Leave a comment

Unwanted

This story made the news a few months ago but I didn’t get around to posting it until now: a family with a child with Down syndrome was refused permanent residency in Canada because it is believed that the costs … Continue reading

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Sick leave: just do it, America!

OK, I live in Canada, but I like the trend toward mandating employers to provide decent sick leave, even for contract workers, that’s gathering momentum in the USA. Several large companies, including Microsoft, are in favour of it. People are … Continue reading

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National pharmacare in the news again

A new study came out in the Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ) this week suggesting that national pharmacare in Canada would save a minimum of $4.2 billion. I’ve written about this topic before, and I hope that this study will … Continue reading

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Under pressure

I saw my gastroenterologist the other day for a regular checkup. The first words out of my mouth were that I’ve been doing well lately on Remicade every 6 weeks, much better than I had been doing on it every … Continue reading

Posted in bureaucracy, evidence-based medicine, fatigue, government policy, illogical, reimbursement, relationships with medical professionals, Remicade, treatment | Leave a comment

National pharmacare in Canada creeps forward (I hope)

Earlier this month, the Canadian Press published an article about the current state of plans for a national pharmacare program in Canada based on a report by Dr. Marc-André Gagnon (“A Roadmap to A Rational Pharmacare Policy in Canada”). The way things stand … Continue reading

Posted in bureaucracy, Exceptional Access Program, government policy, government spending, illogical, insurance, reimbursement, statistics, treatment, Trillium Drug Program | 1 Comment

I’m one of the 12%!

Should I be celebrating? CIHI (the Canadian Institute for Health Information) released a report on spending on prescription drugs in Canada* (PDF) today. The summary page of the report is pretty clear: The majority of public drug spending is for a … Continue reading

Posted in bureaucracy, Exceptional Access Program, fatigue, government policy, government spending, insurance, Ontario Ombudsman, reimbursement, Remicade, statistics, treatment | Leave a comment

Canada’s Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities Report

Canada’s first report on the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities was released today. I looked through it and I can’t say that there’s much new in it at all. It cites Statscan’s 2006 PALS data on disabilities, … Continue reading

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Remicade is not new or experimental, so why does Ontario treat it as if it were?

Why is Ontario’s Provincial Parliament so out of touch about biologic medications? These medications — especially Remicade (infliximab) — account for a significant and fast-growing chunk of Ontario’s health expenditures*, so a rational discussion of how to balance their costs … Continue reading

Posted in anger, bureaucracy, evidence-based medicine, Exceptional Access Program, finances, frustration, government policy, illogical, reimbursement, Remicade, treatment guidelines | Leave a comment